Silence

1. The act of kissing is not a sensual act.  It is, rather, a mutually imposed silence, though sensuality be deployed and appropriated to that end.  It may be both an act of enjoyment and an act of war, but it is always an act of war.  Accordingly, the act of kissing somebody in a moment of sobriety — not in the sense of lucidity, but rather in that of the absence of a challenge to gravity — must be a terrifying thing, for it is in sobriety that the utter meaninglessness of formlessness and silence reveals itself, and thus drives many to engage in senseless acts, as a chamber with purely blank walls may, in time, induce the frantic making of markings.

2. For love, as the song goes, is a battlefield, and it is therefore a fortiori subject to a strict security regime.  It therefore stands to reason that silence, when attention is drawn to it, as when a secret has been discovered and stripped naked, is cause for the most intense and exquisite of panic.